Controversial VH1 TV show Sorority Sisters cancelled

Controversial VH1 TV show Sorority Sisters cancelled

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Well, Sorority Sisters had to be cancelled sooner or later because of all the backlash it has caused, even prior to it launching. The Sorority Sisters VH1 show caused controversy from the beginning, as reported by the Inquisitr, with real-life sorority sisters from Deltas to AKAs to Zetas claiming that those fussing and fighting “sorors” portrayed on VH1 did little to promote what true life is like as a member of a primarily African-American sorority, so an online backlash erupted in hopes that Sorority Sisters would be cancelled.

According to ABC News, the Sorority Sisters VH1 show has been cancelled after all the talk of boycotts and backlash, with online petitions garnering more than 40,000 signatures urging that Sorority Sisters be cancelled. The manner in which VH1 has cancelled Sorority Sisters is unique in and of itself, with the final three out of 10 episodes of Sorority Sisters being shown binge style back-to-back on Friday, January 16, so that Sorority Sisters viewers can get closure for their cancelled show. As reported by the Atlanta-Journal Constitution, VH1 is even invoking an odd time to show the cancelled Sorority Sisters final episode, which airs at 11:10 p.m. ET, and ends after midnight, as if VH1 is trying to bury those sorority sisters into oblivion.

VH1 does have several full episodes of Sorority Sisters on their website, with only video snippets of the special Sorority Sisters — The Dialogue episode, which featured the sorors talking about why they joined the controversial show in the first place. As early as Tuesday, VH1 was debating the fate of the show, but with the news erupting on Wednesday that Sorority Sisters is indeed cancelled, folks are breathing sighs of relief and letting their fingers click the Facebook like and Twitter share buttons on plenty of articles proclaiming that the show they’ve protested from the beginning is now, at last, cancelled.

With several Sorority Sisters responding to the calls for cancellation by pulling their ads from the VH1 show, the network was faced with a backlash that first began when a promo video of Sorority Sisters was shared online. Now, perhaps, instead of launching another primarily African-American “reality” show that includes weave-pulling, name-calling, and loud-talking, VH1 could instead focus on the true-to-life documentaries or dramas that don’t portray blacks in a stereotypical way that draws ire and ends up getting the show cancelled due to boycotts.

 

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